16 Easy DIY Hydroponic Plans You Can Build in Your Garden This Weekend

Posted on

You don’t need a large garden to grow your fresh produce. Nor do you need years of experience to build your own DIY indoor grow system. That is the beauty of hydroponics.

The entire discipline is based on flexibility and inventiveness. There are scores of DIY hydroponics plans floating around the World Wide Web.

Here is a selection of the best homemade hydroponics plans anybody can build. These plans include beginner, intermediate, and expert level setups.

1. The Passive Bucket Kratky Method


The Kratky Method is no doubt one of the easiest hydroponic plans you can start by yourself within several hours.

This system is great for anyone who just gets started with hydroponics. What you need is a bucket, some growing media (like hydroton, perlite), some net pots, hydroponic nutrients, and pH kits. These are all required to set up a passive system (no electricity required) that can run automatically for weeks without maintenance.

You can grow green vegs like lettuces, spinaches at the start or fruits plants like tomatoes after you have got enough experiences.

 

2. Simple Bucket Hydroponic System

This is another simple hydroponic setups for beginners. All you need is a 5-gallon bucket, some growing media like coco coir or perlite-vermiculite, and nutrient mix.

The setup works by using the growing media to make a capillary action, which moves nutrients up to the plants roots.

This system is ideal for single large plants. If you want to keep things basic, you can water the system manually.
For an automated system, you will need another bucket for the reservoir, and a submersible pump, and timer.

 

3. Simple Drip System With Buckets

Another entry-level option, this is a bit more advanced than the single bucket system above. It can still be cobbled together using parts that cost less $100 in total.

The original plan calls for growing four plants in separate buckets, all fed by a common reservoir. This is a very flexible setup that can be expanded in Future.

You can change the size of the containers, and reservoir depending on the size of plants involved. You can use large 4-gallon buckets or smaller containers.

Remember to buy a larger reservoir in case you want to add more plants to the mix later on.

Prev1 of 8Next

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *